Major road work starts next week in an effort to preserve 8-miles of Interstate 82 from the Fred G. Redmon Bridge to N. 1st Street. If you drive a vehicle in the area your trip or commute could be impacted. State officials say specifically as part of the project, the Washington State Department of Transportation and contractor crews will be making repairs to the Naches and Yakima River Bridge decks.

Drivers will see a major detour on west I-82 next week

A press release says for the safety of crews and to help reduce the time travelers will be impacted, westbound I-82 traffic between Yakima and Selah will be detoured onto SR 823 starting in August for about a month.
Signs will guide travelers through the detour. State officials say watch for reduced speeds and please drive carefully through work zones.

Here's the specifics;

Detour
From westbound I-82
Detour signs will direct all westbound traffic onto SR 823. Once on SR 823, signs will direct traffic to move to the far-right lanes to continue west to Ellensburg or to stay in the far left lane to go into Selah.

From N. 1st Street in Yakima
The westbound on-ramp to I-82 will be closed. Follow the signs to SR 823. Once on SR 823, signs will direct traffic to move to the far-right lanes to continue west to Ellensburg or stay in the far left lane to go into Selah.

From eastbound I-82
Eastbound SR 823 will be closed, and signs will direct travelers to take eastbound I-82.

Access to Rest Haven Park & Ride and Harlan Landing
Westbound I-82 travelers will need to turn around at E. Selah Road (exit 29) then head east to exit 30 to access the Rest Haven Park and Ride and Harlan Landing.

From eastbound US 12
Traffic headed into Selah or Ellensburg will follow the detour route from N. 1st Street to SR 823.

LOOK: Milestones in women's history from the year you were born

Women have left marks on everything from entertainment and music to space exploration, athletics, and technology. Each passing year and new milestone makes it clear both how recent this history-making is in relation to the rest of the country, as well as how far we still need to go. The resulting timeline shows that women are constantly making history worthy of best-selling biographies and classroom textbooks; someone just needs to write about them.

Scroll through to find out when women in the U.S. and around the world won rights, the names of women who shattered the glass ceiling, and which country's women banded together to end a civil war.

PHOTOS: Scene at U.S. Capitol shows chaos and violence

NEVER FORGET: Images from 9/11 and the days after