**The 2020 value of U.S. fresh fruit and vegetable exports declined slightly, according to a USDA analysis.

www.thepacker.com reports, the 76-page 2020 U.S. Ag Export Yearbook reported U.S. fresh fruit and vegetable exports reached $6.9 billion in 2020, a 2% decline from 2019.

The report says U.S. apple exports experienced the largest drop, down $105 million, more than half of the overall decline, with the largest losses in Taiwan, India, and Canada.

www.thepacker.com/news/industry/us-fresh-fruit-and-vegetable-exports-show-slight-decline?mkt

**The Supreme Court ruled in Georgia’s favor in a lawsuit filed by Florida over access to water in the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers.

According to the www.gfb.org Florida filed the suit in 2013, claiming Georgia overuses the rivers, which feed into the Apalachicola River that ultimately winds up in Apalachicola Bay, where much of Florida’s oyster production occurs.

Florida said Georgia’s use resulted in lower water flows, causing increased salinity and economic damage to the oyster industry.

www.gfb.org/media-and-publications/news.cms/2021/1005/supreme-court-rules-for-georgia-in-florida-water-lawsuit

**A Purdue University study finds a fraction of U.S. farmers who’ve pursued contracts for capturing carbon in the soil say the going rate is $20 an acre or less.

www.agrimarketing.com reports, companies that sell carbon credits to offset greenhouse gas emissions say the market is still in its infancy and prices will rise with demand.

The carbon credits sequestered are sold to those trying to reduce their own carbon emissions, such as manufacturers and airlines.

www.agriculture.com/news/business/at-dawn-of-carbon-markets-farmers-get-up-to-20-per-acre