HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii's white sand beaches, towering volcanoes and relaxing tropical vistas attract millions of visitors annually from around the globe.

But the announcement of President Donald Trump's second travel ban has stoked fears that tourism, the state's main economic driver, could take a hit.

In a lawsuit Hawaii filed against the ban, state Attorney General Doug Chin said the ban would harm Hawaii by reducing the number of visitors coming to the state.

He says there are already reports of people canceling travel to the U.S. due to the ban.

Some tourism experts say the impact will be minimal, because few people travel from the countries impacted by the travel ban to Hawaii.

Others say the ban goes against the state's welcoming aloha spirit and could lead people to stay away.