I just read the headline to a news story synopsis and I did a double take...sorta like a double cheeseburger double take!  The headline read "those who eat meat more likely to be prejudiced."

Hold on smokey, you better define your terms and explain how you come by this conclusion. 200-million carnivores demand to know.

The original report appeared in the Daily Mail and laid out the premise that "If you enjoy a good burger now and again you may also be a snob!"

Really? Because based on the holier than thou vegans I know I would have thought just the opposite was true...say, wait a minute, does that make me ... prejudiced?

Um, No. Please pass the pork.

Researchers from three universities surveyed 1,000 people and discovered that people don't just eat meat because it tastes good, but also because they believe they "naturally have a position of dominance over animals."

Carsten Koall/Getty Images

I wonder what kind of questions led to the answers that helped them form that conclusion?  Animal rights activists won't like this next question - Would being familiar with the following verse have saved them some time?  In the American King James version of the Bible, Genesis 1:26 reads:

"And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth."

The scientists say believing you have the right to eat meat can also mean you believe in a hierarchical system, or that some people are better than others. (which is a pretty good example as to the difference between secular scientists and Christians!)

At least the scientists add that this sense of meat-eating entitlement  "could" lead one to be prejudiced, but they say it does not mean that meat-eaters are all automatically more likely to marginalize other groups of people. Thanks for that.  As I said before, pass the pork!  (Daily Mail)