If you're a youngster in South Central Washington or the Central Basin, you are living in fertile ground this Halloween.

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The folks at SmartAsset.com came up with their list of the 25 Best Places to Trick-Or-Treat in the United States and both Kennewick and Yakima made the list at Nos. 3 and 17 overall.

Nampa, Idaho, was ranked as best with Kennewick being compared closely to it: "Like in Nampa, there is little chance of rain ruining the trick-or-treating in Kennewick. Kennewick should also have a large contingent going trick-or-treating, over 25 percen of residents here are under the age of 15.
One concern may be housing density. Kennewick has the third-lowest single-family housing density in our top 10. This may mean you need to cover a lot of ground if you want to get all your favorite candy.

SmartAsset surveyed 258 cities to arrive at their list and based their rankings on the following data and criteria:

  • Single-family housing density. This is the number of single-family houses per square mile. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 2015 1-Year American Community Survey.
  • Percent of residents aged 14 or younger. Data comes from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 1-Year American Community Survey.
  • Median home value. Data comes from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 1-Year American Community Survey.
  • Violent crime rate. This is the number of violent crimes per 100,000 residents. Data comes from the FBI’s 2015 and 2014 Uniform Crime Reporting database as well as local police departments’ websites.
  • Property crime rate. This is the number of violent crimes per 100,000 residents. Data comes from the FBI’s 2015 and 2014 Uniform Crime Reporting database as well as local police departments’ websites.
  • Precipitation probability. This is the chance it rains 0.5 inches or snows 0.1 inches on Halloween. Data comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  • Average temperature. This is the average maximum temperature on October 31st. We compared the average maximum temperature to 60 degrees Fahrenheit (what we decided was the ideal trick-or-treating temperature). Data comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.